We’re not just hard workers, we’re good supervisors, and smart managers. We can compete with anybody in this industry, especially if we learn best practices from each other that we can use to better serve our customers
and grow.

Chuy Medrano, CoCal Landscape (Denver, CO)

How we help

We understand the business. We have members from coast to coast and from border to border. Some have been in business for more than twenty years and others for less than ten. Some have grown up in the landscape industry and others, new to our field, are successfully implementing marketing and operating strategies that worked for them in other industries. Some have 400 or more employees while others have less than 20. All are important, all have a story to tell, and all can benefit from being a part of the National Hispanic Landscape Alliance.

We are about growth through learning and sharing. We believe that regardless of how successful we are, we can always get better and we can make our companies better. We believe in sharing what we know and in learning what we don’t know so that we can grow our companies the right way. When we have a challenge or need that others haven’t faced we can find the answers together.

We care. We don’t just care about the environment, we care for it and we make it better every day. Yet while we have been busy building our businesses others, so called environmentalists, have demonized the work that we do and their myths are taking hold in the popular media and influencing public policy. We have the facts on our side and we need to do a better job of speaking out, but it isn’t enough to do our part on our own. Alone our efforts can’t produce the results that our coordinated efforts as members of the National Hispanic Landscape Alliance can.

We matter. No one can speak for us with the impact we have when we speak for ourselves. With approximately half a million U.S. Hispanic households depending on the landscape industry for their livelihood, there should be no doubt that the concerns of the landscape industry are concerns of Hispanic-Americans. Only we can make this fact known. If unchecked, government actions stand to cut demand for landscape services in half, increase labor costs by 50% or more, and make it virtually impossible for reputable landscape companies to source sufficient numbers of laborers to grow their businesses. This is no time to stand on the sidelines and hope someone else can save what we work so hard every day to build. The fact is that when the members of the National Hispanic Landscape Alliance speak Hispanic leaders in Congress and the administration listen.